5 Reasons Why This Mashujaa Day Has No Meaning

By Juma / October 20, 2019 | 7:11 am



Kenya

It is Mashujaa Day and people are going down to the coastal city of Mombasa to celebrate. This is the day that we as Kenyans, remember those who fought for the independence of this nation.

As we celebrate Mashujaa Day, let us acknowledge the fact that this day has lost meaning. It is no longer about our pride as a nation but about those in power who are driving us all into depression and economic recession.

In this country, the rest of us are not Kenyans. We are not human either. We are just flies and cockroaches, at the mercy of the real Kenyans in power.

Here are 5 reasons why this Mashujaa Day makes no sense to millions of Kenyans

  • Unemployment Rate

The unemployment rate is now at 43.5 percent although the government insists that it is below 15 percent.

Each year, institutions of higher learning are sending thousands of graduates into the already flooded job market with no one to help them out.

The government prides itself of having created more than 800,000 imaginary jobs in 2018 with the fact being is those with jobs are those in government.

Cabinet Secretaries are now reappointing dead people into government offices and when we complain they replace the dead with their wives (widows).

  • The Ailing SME Sector

The SME sector is the backbone of Kenya’s economy. The sector is now on its knees and nobody within government gives a damn.

It is becoming a cliché that 1,000 SMEs are dying daily in this country. This translates to at least 30,000 monthly and 450,000 annually.

Despite the fact that the SME sector employs more than 86 percent of the population, the government seems to be keen in seeing it collapse.

The sector is one of the heavily taxed without putting in place mechanisms that would enable the sector to thrive.

  • The Ballooning Public Debt

The public debt is now past 5.6 trillion shillings. By 2022, the government would have borrowed more than 7.2 trillion shillings.

There is a bill in place to cap the national debt at 9 trillion shillings but nobody is saying on what would happen after the debt hits 9 trillion shillings. The rate at which this country is borrowing, the 9 trillion mark will be made even before the bill appears for first reading.

How can we as Kenyans be proud as a nation when our work is to pay debts and taxes as those in power loot?

  • Corruption

Kenya loses 1 trillion shillings every year due to corruption. This is a third of the National Budget going into the pockets of few individuals. In other words, we are budgeting for corruption.

It is like to be part of government, one must have graduated from the school of corruption because the looting of public resources is on another level.

  • Collapsing Economy

Numbers in the hands of government agencies indicate that Kenya’s economy is thriving. The reality on the ground is different.

Companies are closing down and people are losing jobs. In just three months, more than 2,500 people lost their jobs as companies moved to cut down on expenditures.





About Juma

Juma is an enthusiastic journalist who believes that journalism has power to change the world either negatively or positively depending on how one uses it.(020) 528 0222 or Email: [email protected]

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