Suicide Or Murder: Details On The Death Of Ruto’s Guard Sergeant Kenei

By Virginia Mwangi / February 25, 2020 | 7:30 am



Ruto -Kenei

The death of 33-year-old police sergeant Kipyego Kenei in Imara Daima has left the country shaken and confused about whether it was a case of suicide or murder.

The facts being presented are contradicting a suicide note recovered in Kenei’s house in Imara Daima where he lived and is hence pointing to a murder cover-up.

Kenei who worked at the Deputy President’s William Samoei Ruto’s Harambee Annex office for close to a year has been thrown in the limelight following his alegged suicide that is pointing to murder according to detectives.

The late Kenei is reported as having been on duty on the 17th of February 2020 when former CS Rashid Echesa among other named individuals are reported to have visited the office of the Deputy President to strike the scandalous military arms deal.

Revealed Details Proving That Kemei Could Not Have Committed Suicide But Was Murdered

1.Happy Dad and Ready To Wed

Sergeant Kipyego Kenei at the age of 33 years old was a family to a week old infant and was happy about it to the point that he was planning a wedding with the mother of his child come August 2020.

2. Social media accounts deleted before death

Kenei’s social media platforms were deleted days to his death and large sums of money that his wife had never received from him via M-Pesa before was sent to her, 35,000 shillings to be exact and 10,000 shillings sent to his father which was unusual according to the family.

3. Bullet sound not heard in the closely-knit neighborhood despite children being on midterm break.

Kenei lived in a closely-knit neighborhood in Imara Daima and a gunshot sound is deafening which is why questions on how the sound of gunfire was not heard by anyone in the neighborhood arise.  If Kemei had a silencer to contain the gunshot sound, why was the silencer not discovered?

4. Door to Sergeant Kenei’s house was found open

Who opened sergeant Kenei’s door or was it open throughout the night?

5. No pool of blood despite a gunshot wound

Sergeant Kenei’s body was found in his pajamas in his Imara Daima house which is actually a one-roomed servant’s quarter and despite having a gunshot wound that went from his chin to the top of his head, the scene was not a pool of blood as would be expected.

6. Kenei’s body was still not accessible to his family for viewing 48 hours after it was recovered

The family of Sergeant Kenei was not allowed to view his body 48 hours after it was recovered with his house in Imara Daima being marked as a crime scene.

7. The Erroneous OB number OB:31/27/01/2020

According to an OB number apparently reported by ‘Kenei’s neighbors’ there was a foul-smelling emanating from Kenei’s house yet it emerges that Kenei was indeed spotted on Wednesday.

Even if Kenei was not to have been spotted, his body cannot have been rotten by that day which leaves the questions, was Kenei’s death faked before he was even actually dead?

8. Sergeant Kenei had been summoned by the DCI two days before his body was found

Sergeant Kenei was to visit the DCI headquarters on Tuesday as he had been summoned following the scandalous military arms deal that has former CS Rashid Echesa at the center as Kemei was on duty the day CS Echesa held a meeting at the Deputy President’s offices.

Kenei was reported to have been unwell but come the following day, the office of the deputy president reported that he could not be traced forcing a search that led to his body being discovered in Imara Daima.

The 17th of February 2019, Monday might have been just another day at work for Sergeant Kenei but when he clocked to work on the 2nd floor of Harambee Annex offices, a lot was to change and most probably end his life as soon as the truth was to hit the limelight.

The autopsy on the body of Sergeant Kenei is ongoing.







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