Here Are 15 Jobs That No Longer Exist In The World

By Getrude Mathayo / Published September 8, 2021 | 2:36 pm




KEY POINTS

Bowling alley pinsetters were young boys employed at bowling alleys to set up the pins for clients. Generally, a job reserved for teenagers, the lowly paid bowling pinsetter job was the norm before automated pinsetters were introduced in the 1950s.




Many occupations that were commonplace in the past no longer exist on resumes today. Some disappeared due to advancing technology, while others were phased out due to improved labor laws.

While technology has added countless jobs to the workforce over the past century, from network administrators to the Insta-famous, it’s also made a host of professions obsolete along the way. Some people that once held jobs that were considered essential may find themselves out of work

Jobs have popped up and waned throughout the course of human history, and oftentimes, it has been for the better.

In the 21st century, the challenge of choosing a career means finding an area involving skills and knowledge that will remain relevant and will not be taken over by robots as automation becomes ever more sophisticated.

  1. Bowling Pin Setter

Bowling alley pinsetters were young boys employed at bowling alleys to set up the pins for clients. Generally, a job reserved for teenagers, the lowly paid bowling pinsetter job was the norm before automated pinsetters were introduced in the 1950s.

  1. Human Alarm Clock

Knocker-uppers were essentially alarm clocks; they were hired to ensure that people would wake up on time for their own jobs. Some form of the alarm clock has been around since 400(ish). They would use sticks, clubs or pebbles to knock on clients’ windows and doors

  1. Ice Cutter

When reliable refrigeration and freezing didn’t yet exist, ice cutters were tasked with cutting up the ice on frozen lakes. To do this, they would score the ice and then use a horse-powered device to cut the ice block free. Nowadays, the trade is reserved for the artistic pursuit of ice sculpting only

  1. Pre-radar Listener

Before radar, troops used acoustic mirrors and listening devices to focus and detect the sound of engines from approaching aircraft. Between the world wars, there were a variety of acoustic mirror devices that were used to help army’s detect enemy radar

  1. Rat Catcher

Rat-catchers were once employed to control rat populations and prevent the spread of disease. They kept the public safe while bearing the risk of bites and infection themselves.

  1. Lamplighter

Before electric street lights, a lamplighter would go around town extinguishing and lighting gas-burning street lamps. When cities replaced gas lamps with electric light bulbs, lamplighters became jobless. The only lamplighters today exist purely for tourist purposes, but before the 19th century night, owl lamplighters were responsible for lighting the streets.

  1. Milkmen

Most households used to rely on local milkmen to deliver milk right to their door. When home refrigerators became common, the milkman’s services were no longer needed. Milkman hasn’t been a common job since the 1970s, though in some places it is seeing a revival.

  1. Log Driver

Before the technology or infrastructure was available to transport logs by truck, log drivers would float and guide them down rivers from logging sites to processing areas. This highly dangerous job became less common as railroads and trucking routes became more efficient

  1. Switchboard Operator

The earliest telephones were extremely difficult to use, so telephone companies hired switchboard operators to assist with connecting customers. Switchboard operation was an early example of women entering the workforce, as their “courteous manner” was deemed more suitable to this type of role.

  1. Resurrectionist

One of the more gruesome extinct jobs is that of The Resurrectionist. Resurrectionists, or “body snatchers,” were hired in the 19th century to remove corpses from graves for universities to use as cadavers.

  1. Soda Jerk

A job as a soda jerk was ideal for many young people during the 20th century. Youths could often be found handling soda spigots while wearing bow ties and white paper hats as they served up ice cream and soda drinks to order

  1. Factory Lector

Before the radio, factory workers often hired lectors to entertain them while they worked. The workers pooled their wages, held auditions, and had lectors read to them over their long shifts.

  1. Leech collector

A leech collector was responsible for retrieving the blood-sucking worms from their natural habitat for doctors to use. Individuals with this job would use the legs of animals or their own legs to lure leeches from creeks and rivers.

  1. Pinsetter

In the early 1900s, young men were hired as pinsetters in bowling alleys to reset the bowling pins after they had been knocked down by bowling balls. After a bowler would take a turn, the pinsetter would jump into a pit, clear the downed pins, and roll the ball back to the bowler.

  1. Elevator operator

Elevator operators would greet guests and shuffle patrons from floor to floor, but they have gone extinct as people are now choosing to press their own elevator buttons.

Read More: Here Is A List Of Top 16 Highest Paying Jobs In The World







More Articles From This Author








Trending Stories










Other Related Articles










SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE



ARCHIVES

2021
  • January 2021 (182)
  • February 2021 (227)
  • March 2021 (325)
  • April 2021 (260)
  • May 2021 (285)
  • June 2021 (273)
  • July 2021 (277)
  • August 2021 (233)
  • September 2021 (148)
  • 2020
  • January 2020 (272)
  • February 2020 (310)
  • March 2020 (390)
  • April 2020 (321)
  • May 2020 (335)
  • June 2020 (327)
  • July 2020 (334)
  • August 2020 (276)
  • September 2020 (214)
  • October 2020 (233)
  • November 2020 (242)
  • December 2020 (187)
  • 2019
  • January 2019 (253)
  • February 2019 (216)
  • March 2019 (285)
  • April 2019 (254)
  • May 2019 (272)
  • June 2019 (250)
  • July 2019 (338)
  • August 2019 (293)
  • September 2019 (306)
  • October 2019 (313)
  • November 2019 (362)
  • December 2019 (319)
  • 2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (213)
  • March 2018 (278)
  • April 2018 (225)
  • May 2018 (237)
  • June 2018 (178)
  • July 2018 (256)
  • August 2018 (249)
  • September 2018 (256)
  • October 2018 (287)
  • November 2018 (284)
  • December 2018 (186)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (194)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (205)
  • July 2017 (190)
  • August 2017 (195)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (235)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (165)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (190)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (245)
  • June 2016 (182)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (248)
  • September 2016 (234)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (153)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (166)
  • April 2015 (108)
  • May 2015 (116)
  • June 2015 (120)
  • July 2015 (148)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (188)
  • October 2015 (169)
  • November 2015 (173)
  • December 2015 (207)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950