ChildFund and Longhorn Publishers to support ECD in Baringo County

By Korir Isaac / Published October 14, 2021 | 4:13 pm




KEY POINTS

The program will improve collaboration in the design, formulation, and implementation of programs that contribute to the quality of and access to ECD education in 16 ear-marked counties.


ECD Education

Childfund and Longhorn Publishers today rolled out a program aimed at improving the quality of and access to early childhood development (ECD) education in Kenya.

The project, dubbed Enhancing Quality Pre-Primary Education in Kenya was officially marked today at a kick-off event held in Nairobi.

It will be implemented in a 3-month pilot phase in Baringo to enhance the quality of education delivered to pre-primary school children through learning materials and teacher empowerment.

The program will improve collaboration in the design, formulation, and implementation of programs that contribute to the quality of and access to ECD education in 16 ear-marked counties.

With a goal of developing and rolling out an ECD e-Learning solution program including in-service training of ECD teachers and caregivers, the project is hoped to be a success.

ALSO READ: Championing Inclusion and Literacy to Embrace Digital Revolution for the Girl Child

Its focus is also on providing learning materials to ECD centers in the counties of interest as it seeks to rehabilitate and equip learning infrastructure in identified counties.

The project was conceptualized after the realization of the need to add value to the provision of quality learning opportunities to the pre-primary school learners in the country.

It complements the County Governments’ efforts to improve the quality of education through the provision of learning materials and building capacity of pre-primary schoolteachers in CBC facilitation skills.

After the pilot phase in Baringo county, the program will be extended to 8 other counties including Samburu, Machakos, Kajiado, Homabay, Kisumu, Elgeyo Marakwet, Isiolo, and Tharaka Nithi by August 2022.

Speaking during the launch, Hon. Stanley Kiptis, the Baringo County Governor lauded both organizations for coming to the rescue of hundreds of children at the most critical time of their development.

“Research has shown that a child’s early years are the foundation for his or her future development, providing a strong base for lifelong learning and learning abilities, including cognitive and social development. Such collaborative efforts will ensure that these children become responsible adults able to contribute to national development,” the Governor said.

“Partnerships like these increase your lease of knowledge, expertise, and resources available to reach a greater audience and impact lives positively. Thank you, Longhorn Publishers and the County Government of Baringo for your willingness to stand with us to support these little ones,” concluded ChildFund’s Africa Regional Director, Chege Ngugi.

The project will reach over 29,000 public pre-primary school learners, 1,227 pre-primary schoolteachers, and 698 pre-primary schools.





About Korir Isaac

A creative, tenacious, and passionate journalist with impeccable ethics and a nose for anticipated and spontaneous news. He may not say it, but he sure can make one hell of a story.

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