Why The Mulembe Nation Will Not Be Producing A President Soon

By Juma / Published October 16, 2021 | 10:20 am




KEY POINTS

A Luhya kills the ambitions and aspirations of his fellow Luhya daily instead of wanting to see his fellow Luhya succeed. 93 percent of opportunities lost by Luhyas are as a result of another Luhya. 


Kenya

Mulembe means peace. It is a common term among the Bukusu who inhabit most parts of Bungoma County. But is also a term used to refer to the Luhya Nation, hence the Mulembe Nation. You will still be right if you refer to them as the Peace Nation.

And indeed, the Luhya people are generally peaceful. They are the people of Mulembe and peace is part of them. They are not cowards as many people might think but they do not fight. But this is not how other parts of the nation see them. Others see them as cowards, gullible, and fools.

Among the Bukusu, there is a saying that goes Siyanja barende (people who love outsiders.) The saying might seem like any other but it defines the whole of Luhya Nation. The Luhya Nation loves visitors (outsiders) so much that they would rather sleep hungry and let an outsider eat.

There is another saying among the same Bukusu community that goes Mayi omuro sali mayi, in Swahili, it is Mama wa kambo si mama (simply means your step-mother is never and will never be your real mum). But the Luhya have been positioned to think otherwise.

The last saying that I will use to explain the Mulembe Nation is Nandakhaulila kakona khumwanda kwenjofu (a person who doesn’t listen to warnings ends up sleeping on the path that jumbos use.) It is the same as the Swahili one that goes, Asiyesikia la mkuu, huvunjika guu.

Read More: Any Political Deal With The Luhya Without The Youth Is Dead On Arrival

Why am I using all these sayings? You may ask. And by the way, am talking about the Luhya Nation. So, if you feel the story is tiring you with many Luhya sayings and takataka zingine, it is because you are not Luhya. Let the Luhya read. Asante.

Back to the “People who love peace”, the Siyanja barende themselevuss! As we all know, this is the season of words in Kenya. It is the season of fat words and thin words, tall words and short words, big words and small words. It is a season of words.

Because it is a season of words, tongues are wagging. Every community is shouting their lungs out as to why they deserve the national cake. You have heard of the Mount Kenya Foundation. They are even interviewing Presidential Candidates because they believe they are the ones who should determine who occupies the House on the Hill.

Other communities are gearing up for the “National Cake”. They have their “preferred candidates” for the sole purpose of bargaining for part of whoever will take over as the President of the Republic of Kenya. And then, there is the Mulembe Nation.

The Mulembe Nation seems to be in its own world. Clueless and unaware of what is going on. It reminds me of a verse in the Bible that says, then I saw the Israelites scattered in the wilderness, like people with no leader. Then a voice said, these people have no leader, let them go home. For years, the Mulembe Nation has remained without a leader.

The hope of the Mulembe Nation producing a leader was born through Masinde Muliro. He was a charismatic leader. His untimely death is still a riddle. It is even rumored that some of his Luhya friends masterminded his death.

Another glimmer of hope was born during the time of Michael Wamalwa Kijana. He rose to become the Vice President of the Republic of Kenya. He was a great leader and would speak and people would sit to listen. When he spoke, nobody coughed because a leader was speaking. Again, death being so cruel, plugged him.

Musalia Mudavadi was another promising leader. He also rose to become the Vice President of the Republic of Kenya and some point, a Deputy Prime Minister. But how he melted from the national politics, only him and his ancestors know.

Read More: Is Mukhisa Kituyi The Safe Pair Of Hands That Kenya Needs?

As the country prepares for a general election, Musalia Mudavadi says he wants to be the President of Kenya. Moses Masika Wetangula is still confused within the One Kenya Alliance not knowing whether to run or not, Mukhisa Kituyi says he is very much in the race and wants to be the President. Wycliffe Ambetsa Oparanya had also announced that he was “running” but has since “shelved” his ambitions for Raila Odinga.

Other regions beat the Mulembe Nation because they are united. They have a leader and they choose to stand behind that leader as one. But Luhyas are never united. Each on their own. Luhya leaders are selfish and only care about their own personal interests.

Here is what ails the Luhya Nation:

A Luhya kills the ambitions and aspirations of his fellow Luhya daily instead of wanting to see his fellow Luhya succeed. 93 percent of opportunities lost by Luhyas are as a result of another Luhya. Be it scholarships, lucrative appointments, political aspirations, Military Conscription, promotion, etc.

They even can’t support one of their own for Presidency they have the numbers than most communities in Kenya. Luhya leaders steal from their people and send the money back to their political masters from other communities for whom they borrow the same money for small political sponsorship.

The truth is, every successful Luhya does not want to spend his money in the home county. In fact, some Luhya do not want to be identified as Luhyas. Instead of spending this money in their own county to benefit and uplift their people, they waste it elsewhere.

Statistics show that a Kikuyu man’s money exchanges hands 18 times before leaving his community while for Luhyas it is probably a maximum of once or even zero and it’s used to downgrade each other. Only 6% of Luhya opportunities find their way back to into their community.

This is why among the most populous tribes in Kenya, the Kalenjins, Kikuys, and Luos are at the top and Luhyas are at the bottom of every ladder of society. They are cooks and night guards at their best.

Instead of downgrading each other and sounding hopeless, the Luhya Nation can come together, stop being ignorant and stupid, and know that they have the numbers, and hence, the ability to have one of their own in the house on the hill.

So, what can the Luhya Nation do? Simple. Luhya leaders should stop being foolish, ignorant, greedy, and jealous of each other’s success. They should stop fighting for village positions and focus on creating their profiles nationally. They should take care of their people.

Read More: Here Are 10 Most Populous Tribes In Kenya





About Juma

Juma is an enthusiastic journalist who believes that journalism has power to change the world either negatively or positively depending on how one uses it.(020) 528 0222 or Email: info@sokodirectory.com

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