The 5 Stages Of Grief In A Political Sphere

By Lynnet Okumu / Published August 15, 2022 | 10:34 am



pressure

The loss of a loved one comes with emotions that may feel impossible to put into words.

The same may be said of a person who feels disappointed because his/her expectations have not been met.

It could be in any line; social, economic, or even political. Like in the case where one expected a particular candidate to emerge as the winner but the other one scoops the victory.

These types of people are likely undergoing the different stages of grief knowing or unknowingly. They have just realized that they have lost but are so adamant to accept the fact.

The stages of grief in the political sphere

  1. Denial

This is the first thing a person would try to do when they find out they have lost. Not accept!

Sometimes the feeling is overwhelming. This breeds shock and body numbness.

This is only right because our bodies can only absorb as many emotions as they can handle. Beyond that might feel unacceptable!

Many have been here, especially in the political sphere where people are afraid of acknowledging that their candidates have been defeated, even if it’s on fairgrounds.

However as this shock fades away, feelings that have been suppressed will begin to surface.

  1. Anger

Although it’s rightly said that the anger we feel after a loss is an indication of the strength of our love for that person, it could be destructive.

Many people get angry when they realize that whatever they hoped for no longer stands a chance.

Just to know that that person or something you built your trust and hope in, is fully crashing can turn you into a beast. This anger is normally directed at people around us: friends relatives, family, neighbors, etc.

The worst case still, is witnessing a victory from the side you had not imagined or anticipated.

  1. Bargaining

After a loss, it’s only natural to want life to go back to the way it was. Statements like if only he/she could have done it this way, or if this didn’t happen or even if they could have seen it earlier, will flood your mind.

This stage is associated with a lot of regrets about not doing things the right way. Of course, you or they might have done things the right way, it’s only that it didn’t yield your expected results.

This is just a temporary feeling to avoid more hurting. The person is more or less just trying to console themselves.

For example, it’s because they didn’t do this that they have lost, not because they don’t merit!

  1. Depression

Just like grieving a permanent situation like death, failure to clinch an expectation can also lead to depression..

For example, people tend to associate feelings with their political affiliations. When things have not gone as they hoped for they get so emotional.

They end up becoming stressed, and eventually depressed from overthinking, and maybe over expectations.

Of course, this is an integral part of grieving but, it could be dangerous to a person’s psychological health.

Some people cry and wail just to show their emotions. Others just remain weirdly quiet.

  1. Acceptance

It’s not like they are okay with the loss but they realize it’s time to accept the painful reality.

Acceptance isn’t moving on, nor is it the endpoint of the grieving process.

It can be making new connections and relationships, listening to our own needs, or just simply living again—but only doing so after we have grieved.

A case of the political situation is why a person accepts the fact that yes, their candidate has been defeated but life has to move on.

It means they have to welcome the new beginning and now work with the available option.






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