What TSC And KNUT Battles Mean For Teachers

By Wilkister Alao / November 6, 2019 | 9:27 am



tsc

The Teachers Service Commission (TSC) yesterday, 5th November threatened to cut links with the longest-serving teachers union, Kenya National Union of Teachers (KNUT).

TSC gave KNUT a 60-day notice to revoke its recognition agreement with the commission on grounds that the inion does not meet the simple minimum required of all unions.

If TSC makes real their threat, it will mark a turning point in the history of the country’s trade unionism, while affecting primary school tutors.

Primary school teachers will have to operate without a union to air their grievances and rally them together in pushing for better terms.

They will not be able to do any CBA negotiations and give feedback of work to their employer, which will make TSC the ultimate decision-maker without opposition.

Founded in 1957, KNUT has been the oldest teachers union, until 1998 when Kuppet was formed to represent post-primary school teachers, but KNUT remained more vocal and more influential, many times giving the teachers’ employer a hard time by fearlessly leading long strikes in the course of fighting for teachers’ rights.

Apart from long teachers strikes that have been witnessed in the country, KNUT and TSC has had wars and endless court battles but what seemed to have prompted the latest decision of terminating KNUT’s recognition agreement is the disruption of Competency-Based Curriculum (CBC) training across the country, led by KNUT’s Secretary General Wilson Sossion who was deregistered as a teacher last week by TSC.

Sources from the government said that this (CBC disruption), and the subsequent events that followed are what led to the bad blood between TSC and KNUT, leading TSC to call on the revocation of KNUT’s agreement.

Interestingly, KNUT has been enjoying its huge following until recently when the commission was fighting KNUT in court over career progression rules.

KNUT’s was rejecting the commission’s argument that upgrades should not be automatic but guided by existing vacancies and performance when TSC resorted to stopping the implementation of 2017-2021 CBA for teachers under KNUT.

It is the Labour Court’s ruling in favor of KNUT and TSC’s reaction to stop CBA for KNUT members that led to a major exodus of teachers from KNUT to its rival Kuppet, significantly reducing the number of members in KNUT.

KUPPET, whose recognition agreement with TSC is only eight years old, and which is largely passive and rarely opposes TSC, recently appeared to be in full support of the commission before the two school heads association bodies, Kepsha and Kessha joined them in criticizing KNUT.

TSC’s notice to KNUT dated 5th November, would be what will seem as KNUT’s last kicks, but they are not down yet, they have decided to challenge TSC’s decision in court.

During KNUT’s leadership crisis meeting, the officials wrote a tough letter to TSC demanding that an urgent meeting be held within seven days to tackle pending issues.

Reacting to TSC’s letter on the call to cut links, KNUT’s Wilson Sossion said that TSC was frustrating KNUT by inciting teachers to dump the union and that even with the lack of simple majority, the rule on simple majority applies only at the time of registration.

“TSC is attacking KNUT by illegally introducing a validation portal which targeted KNUT members and saw about 16,000 members ditch the union,” said Sossion.

Other trade unionists led by the Central Organization of Trade Union (Cotu) said that TSC was unfair in their decision and called on the two parties to settle their differences.

Cotu secretary-general, Mr. Francis Atwoli said that they would reject TSC decision at the Labour Court since it was unconstitutional and against labor laws.

“TSC has no power to do what they want. They must follow the law. In Kenya today, even five people can sign a CBA, which is why we will reject their decision in court,” said Atwoli.

Universities Academic Staff Union (Uasu) and Kenya University Staff Union leaders said they would give their views on the matter today, 6th November.







More Articles From This Author







Trending Stories










Other Related Articles










SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE



ARCHIVES

2019
  • January 2019 (256)
  • February 2019 (216)
  • March 2019 (285)
  • April 2019 (254)
  • May 2019 (272)
  • June 2019 (251)
  • July 2019 (339)
  • August 2019 (293)
  • September 2019 (306)
  • October 2019 (314)
  • November 2019 (214)
  • 2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (219)
  • March 2018 (278)
  • April 2018 (225)
  • May 2018 (238)
  • June 2018 (178)
  • July 2018 (257)
  • August 2018 (249)
  • September 2018 (256)
  • October 2018 (287)
  • November 2018 (284)
  • December 2018 (187)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (195)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (205)
  • July 2017 (190)
  • August 2017 (195)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (235)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (165)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (190)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (245)
  • June 2016 (182)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (248)
  • September 2016 (234)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (153)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (166)
  • April 2015 (108)
  • May 2015 (116)
  • June 2015 (120)
  • July 2015 (148)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (188)
  • October 2015 (169)
  • November 2015 (174)
  • December 2015 (207)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950