Dear Entrepreneur, Here Are Top 10 Richest People Of All Time

By Getrude Mathayo / Published May 11, 2022 | 12:54 pm




KEY POINTS

The King of Timbuktu & Malian emperor controlled a huge empire that covered much of modern-day Mali and Ghana and had half of the world’s supply of gold at his disposal.


Gold

KEY TAKEAWAYS


Andrew Carnegie led the massive expansion of the US steel industry in the late 19th century, amassing a personal fortune economists estimate would be worth $337 billion (£242bn) nowadays.


Everyone wants to be rich, they want to be listed on the world’s richest people list. Money doesn’t make you rich in a holistic sense but people across the world will always remember you if you’re rich

All of the richest people in the world share two common wealth-building traits, they all invest in businesses or have built companies that have gone on to be worth billions or trillions of dollars, and they have benefitted from the passing of time and the effect of compound interest

With so much of their wealth in publicly traded stocks, the net worth of the richest can fluctuate with market valuations.

  1. Genghis Khan – Peak Net worth $100s trillion

Genghis Khan is undoubtedly one of the most successful military leaders of all time.

The fearsome Mongol leader conquered a mind-blowing 12 million square miles of land between 1206 and his death in 1227, more than anyone else in history.

  1. Emperor Shenzong of Song – peak net worth: $30 trillion

Shenzong ruled China from 1067-1085 during the ‘Peaceful Prosperity’ and ‘Primary Abundance’ eras when he controlled around 30 percent of global GDP, the equivalent of over $30 trillion (£21.6tn) today.

  1. Akbar I – peak net worth: $21 trillion (£15tn)

Renowned for his lavish lifestyle and patronage of the arts, this emperor conquered hundreds, He controlled around 25 percent of the world’s GDP at the time, which would translate to a staggering $21 trillion (£15tn) today.

  1. Augustus Caesar – peak net worth: $4.63 trillion (£3.3tn)

The first Roman emperor, who ruled the vast empire from 27 BC until his death in AD 14, boasted a personal fortune equivalent to 20 percent of the entire empire’s economy, worth $4.63 trillion (£3.3tn) nowadays.

  1. Mansa Musa I of Mali – peak net worth: $415 billion (£299bn)

The King of Timbuktu & Malian emperor controlled a huge empire that covered much of modern-day Mali and Ghana and had half of the world’s supply of gold at his disposal.

  1. John D. Rockefeller – peak net worth: $367 billion (£264bn)

Widely regarded as the richest American who ever lived, John D. Rockefeller founded the Standard Oil company in 1870 and ended up controlling around 90 percent of the US oil business.

  1. Andrew Carnegie – peak net worth: $337 billion (£242bn)

Andrew Carnegie led the massive expansion of the US steel industry in the late 19th century, amassing a personal fortune economists estimate would be worth $337 billion (£242bn) nowadays.

  1. Tsar Nicholas II of Russia – peak net worth: $300 billion (£216bn)

He ruled over the Russian Empire from 1894 to 1917, making him one of the richest monarchs in history. A 1916 estimate of the tsar’s personal fortune equates to $300 billion (£216bn) in today’s money.

  1. Jakob Fugger – peak net worth: $277 billion (£199bn)

He was Europe’s richest man during the early 16th century. His enormous wealth enabled him to influence the politics of the time, funding the rise of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I, as well as bankrolling the Spanish

  1. Elon Musk – peak net worth: $264 Billion

A modern-day maverick, Musk has seen his fortune grow at a stratospheric rate thanks to a huge increase in the share price of Tesla, the electric car firm he’s CEO of. He presently owns Twitter and is the richest person on earth.

Read More: Dear Entrepreneur, Here Are Top 10 Money Skills To Learn In Your 30s






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