Politics: The Game of Temporary Convenience

By Soko Directory Team / May 24, 2016




The CORD coalition took to the streets to demand the removal of IEBC, the electoral body in the country.

It is now week three but the demonstration are growing bigger and bigger each passing day. Monday has been dubbed “tear gas Monday” because it has become the norm to get teargas canisters lobbed at you by anti-riot police.

The Independent and Electoral and Boundary Commission (IEBC) has stayed put not because they want but because they are protected by the Constitution.

In article 251 of the Kenyan constitution ‘’A person desiring the removal of a member of a commission or of a holder of an independent office on any ground specified in clause (1) may present a petition to the national assembly setting out the alleged facts constituting that ground”.

It continues to clearly outline the steps to be followed once the petition is on the floor of the national assembly. If the members are found guilty of the allegations by the tribunal appointed by the president then (and only then) will the removal from office be carried through.

About the demonstrations, article 37 of the Kenyan constitution clearly states “Every person has the right, peaceably and unarmed, to assemble, to demonstrate, to picket, and to present petitions to public authorities”.

Looking at that part of the Constitution it’s clear that something went wrong from the word go.

We have a constitution that is supposed to safeguard the citizens of the country and when it is ignored then things go out of hand.

If the leaders took the matters to the floor of the house, there would be no demonstrations, no teargassing and no disruption of business. Now we have demonstrations every Monday with violent demonstrators going out to disrupt the lives of Kenyans countrywide.

 3 Kenyans have so far lost their lives with many other sustaining serious injuries. No justification for what the police have done but all this could have been avoided by following the constitution. 

The police used force but they were reacting to a group of demonstrators who were armed. The officers too are human; do we think of the police officers manning the demonstration. What if that huge stone hit one on them?

We are burning our country and it is really shameful. Tourists will flee from the country and so will investors, after which we will blame the government for the poor economy of thew country.

When will we learn that Kenya is greater than any one of us and politics is a game of convenience? When will say to politicians who wants to watch to our beloved country burn?

When this Country burns (God forbid) it is me and you, the common Mwananchi, who will suffer. The politicians on the other hand will take flights to distant lands of safety and watch the chaos unfold from a safe distance.

We should agree to disagree and after that move on with life just like they do. If you look closely at our politicians, one time or another, they have worked with each other, albeit under different political affiliations.

When one is affected, they stand together and forget their political differences. If it’s a lesson we need in politics we should learn from the politicians themselves. Remember, dear fellow Kenyan, politics is a game of convenience.


Article by Amina Mbuthia.

 



About Soko Directory Team

Soko Directory is a Financial and Markets digital portal that tracks brands, listed firms on the NSE, SMEs and trend setters in the markets eco-system.Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/SokoDirectory and on Twitter: twitter.com/SokoDirectory

View other posts by Soko Directory Team


More Articles From This Author








Other Related Articles










SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE

ARCHIVES

2019
  • January 2019 (256)
  • February 2019 (216)
  • March 2019 (285)
  • April 2019 (254)
  • May 2019 (272)
  • June 2019 (252)
  • July 2019 (340)
  • August 2019 (227)
  • 2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (219)
  • March 2018 (278)
  • April 2018 (225)
  • May 2018 (238)
  • June 2018 (178)
  • July 2018 (257)
  • August 2018 (249)
  • September 2018 (256)
  • October 2018 (287)
  • November 2018 (284)
  • December 2018 (187)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (195)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (205)
  • July 2017 (190)
  • August 2017 (195)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (235)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (165)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (190)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (246)
  • June 2016 (183)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (249)
  • September 2016 (234)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (153)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (166)
  • April 2015 (109)
  • May 2015 (117)
  • June 2015 (121)
  • July 2015 (150)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (189)
  • October 2015 (170)
  • November 2015 (174)
  • December 2015 (208)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950