Here are 12 Ways to Store Plastic Pipes from Apex Steel

By Juma Fred / June 13, 2018




The construction sector is one of the flourishing sectors in the country. However, if you asked any investor or contractor, one of the main challenges they face is losses in form of wastes and breakages.

Most breakages and losses come from glasses and plastic pipes and according to experts at Apex Steel, the main reason is just that many people don’t know how to store and handle the materials.

Here are 12 ways that one can safely store plastic pipes:

  1. All storage areas should be flat and kept free from stones and sharp-edged objects.
  2. Pipes are to be stored in such a way to prevent any contamination of the insides.
  3. End closure caps should be removed just before installation.
  4. Storage zones and stack heights are to be chosen which avoid possible damage or permanent deformation.
  5. Large diameter pipes with low wall-thicknesses are to be provided with stiffener rings.
  6. Single point or longitudinal contact support for any pipe is to be avoided.
  7. Non-pelleted pipes should be stacked in heights not exceeding 1 meter. This is not applicable for pipes which are stacked on pallets providing their full weight is supported by the frame of the pallet. In principle, coiled pipes are to be either laid flat or placed in a suitable protective framework for storage.
  8. Fastening bands should not be removed until shortly before installation.
  9. If pipes are correctly stacked on pallets and secured against lateral movement, stacking heights may be increased by 50 percent.
  10. The location where pipe and piping components are stored must provide as much protection as possible.
  11. Pipes should not be allowed to come into contact with fuels, solvents, oil, greases, paints (silicones) or heat sources during storage.
  12. Dragging pipes and coils over the ground must be avoided at all times.

 

If you have been experiencing losses as an investor or a contractor, it is high time you tried those 12 steps.

 



About Juma Fred

Juma Fredrick is an enthusiastic journalist who believes that journalism has power to change the world either negatively or positively depending on how one uses it. You can reach him on: (020) 528 0222 or Email: [email protected]

View other posts by Juma Fred


More Articles From This Author







Other Related Articles








SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE

ARCHIVES

2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (220)
  • March 2018 (279)
  • April 2018 (226)
  • May 2018 (240)
  • June 2018 (85)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (195)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (206)
  • July 2017 (190)
  • August 2017 (196)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (236)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (167)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (190)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (246)
  • June 2016 (183)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (250)
  • September 2016 (234)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (154)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (166)
  • April 2015 (109)
  • May 2015 (117)
  • June 2015 (121)
  • July 2015 (150)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (189)
  • October 2015 (171)
  • November 2015 (174)
  • December 2015 (208)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950