Child Mortality: 1 in Every 19 Children Born in Kenya Don’t Reach their 5th Birthday

By Korir Isaac / February 21, 2019




Child mortality in Kenya is anything but improved. The number of deaths that have been experienced over the years is a marker for the social, economic, environmental and health care systems that children are born into.

Unfortunately, Kenya has not done enough regarding the planning of health strategies, programs, and interventions to ensure that the rate of these deaths is reduced.

What the country should do is scrutinize the mapping of child mortality going back decades to come up with the best health policies.

One Kenyan study published on BMC Public Health set out to estimate child mortality rates in each of the country’s 47 counties every year since 1965.

From the findings, it was indicated that not long after our country gained independence in 1963, one in every seven Kenyan children born alive, died before the age of five.

The child mortality rate has since dropped significantly, an overall decline of 62 percent, but it still is one of the highest. The study found out that in every 19 children born today, one of them doesn’t reach his or her 5th birthday.

Over time, however, the mortality rate was uneven. It declined consistently from the 1970s to 1980s and again from early 2000 to 2013. But there was stagnation or reversal between these declines during the 1990s.

In 2000, during the world summit for children with a focus on reducing child mortality, the goal agreed was to bring down the rate to a third, or to 70 deaths per 1000 live births. However, Kenya fell short of the goal and managed a 48 percent reduction against a target of 67 percent as from 1990 to 2015.

Overview of Child Mortality in Counties Since 1965

On the county level, the majority of those on the coastal region, a total of 11 counties registered more than 20 percent or 200 deaths per 1000 live births. Only four counties during this period realized rates below 75 deaths in 1000 live births.

The trend has since changed and there has been a significant reduction in child deaths since 1965 to 2015. Despite the declines, still, by 2013, the same counties that had the highest rates still come at the top.

READ Kenyan Parents with Many Children are the Poorest 

The success has been variable, and the reductions have ranged from 19 and 80 percent. The study indicates that by 2013 there was a difference of 3.8 times between high mortality and low mortality counties, a reduction from five-fold in 1965.

Challenges

Since the goals under millennium development goal 4 were set, by 2015, there was no county in Kenya that ad achieved them. This only serves to show that Kenya still has a long way to go in reducing child mortality rates.

The current devolved governments have several initiatives aimed at improving child survival and populations wellbeing.

Counties are setting local targets for the initiative through integrated development plans and statistical plans. Also, the President’s agenda of universal healthcare is another exemplary initiative.

The initiative focusses on providing individuals and communities with access to health services they need without suffering financial hardship. This is expected to reduce inequalities and will need to be monitored.

However, it can only be achieved well if the allocation and distribution of health-related resources are implemented well.

The study also recommended that counties need to focus on rolling out targeted packages of intervention tailored to individual contexts, alongside existing interventions if they are to record further child mortality declines.



About Korir Isaac

A creative, tenacious, and passionate journalist with impeccable ethics and a nose for anticipated and spontaneous news. He may not say it, but he sure can make one hell of a story.

View other posts by Korir Isaac


More Articles From This Author








Other Related Articles










SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE

ARCHIVES

2019
  • January 2019 (256)
  • February 2019 (216)
  • March 2019 (287)
  • April 2019 (254)
  • May 2019 (220)
  • 2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (219)
  • March 2018 (278)
  • April 2018 (225)
  • May 2018 (238)
  • June 2018 (178)
  • July 2018 (257)
  • August 2018 (249)
  • September 2018 (256)
  • October 2018 (287)
  • November 2018 (285)
  • December 2018 (187)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (195)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (206)
  • July 2017 (190)
  • August 2017 (195)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (235)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (166)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (190)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (246)
  • June 2016 (183)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (249)
  • September 2016 (234)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (153)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (166)
  • April 2015 (109)
  • May 2015 (117)
  • June 2015 (121)
  • July 2015 (150)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (189)
  • October 2015 (170)
  • November 2015 (174)
  • December 2015 (208)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950