We Are Tax Compliant – Ronald Karauri, CEO SportPesa

By Soko Directory Team / July 13, 2019



KRA

Is the government targeting some betting firms without following the due process of finding out as to whether the firms have abided by the laid down rules?

Is the onslaught by the government against betting firms a calculated move to pave way for other new players and not “about the consumer” as government claims?

The government, through the Ministry of Interior and the Betting Control and Licensing Board, made real its threat to “shape” the betting sector in the country by suspending licenses for 27 firms.

The firms whose licenses were suspended include the giant betting company, SportPesa, a key player in Kenya’s sporting activities in terms of sponsorships and support.

“We are tax compliant and we will work with key stakeholders to ensure everything is back to normal,” Said Mr. Ronald Karauri, the CEO of SportPesa.

The government ordered telecommunications companies to suspend the paybill numbers to the affected firms. This meant those looking to place bets would not do so. The paybill number for SportPesa was suspended on Friday at 10 AM.

“I believe this is due to a misunderstanding and I also believe that all these issues can be resolved by dialogue and we are currently engaging all key stakeholders to ensure that everything is back to normal,” added Mr. Karauri.

SportPesa has 400 employees and has been sponsoring Kenya’s AFC Leopards and Gor Mahia. For the first time, the company made it possible for Everton to visit Kenya to play with Kenya’s Kariobangi Sharks.

 

“To be honest, SportPesa has done more to our sporting sector than the government. Imagine the sponsorships? The supporting of talents and sometimes taking part in the renovation of stadiums. The government should rethink its decision,” said one of the players in the sector and who did not to be mentioned because he is not authorized to speak to the press.

Read:

Let Us Be Realistic

The government is making it look like sports betting is the worst evil that has to be fought by all means necessary. According to the government, 76 percent of Kenyan youth are gamblers but what the government is not telling Kenyans is why the youth are gambling in the first place.

The Kenyan youth is betting because he or she has no job. The employment rate is at 43.5 percent, which the government does not want to admit. The absorption rate in the job market is less than 3 percent and the Kenyan youth has basically been left alone. Betting has helped thousands of them.

The government says the reason why 500,000 Kenyan youth are at the CRB is because of betting. That is a lie. The 500,000 Kenyans who owe less than 200 shillings on the CRB list have been blacklisted courtesy of online mobile loan apps. Betting firms do not blacklist anyone at the CRB. In fact, IEA found out that there was no relationship between an increase in uptake of mobile loans and betting.



About Soko Directory Team

Soko Directory is a Financial and Markets digital portal that tracks brands, listed firms on the NSE, SMEs and trend setters in the markets eco-system.Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/SokoDirectory and on Twitter: twitter.com/SokoDirectory

View other posts by Soko Directory Team


More Articles From This Author








Other Related Articles










SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE

ARCHIVES

2019
  • January 2019 (256)
  • February 2019 (216)
  • March 2019 (285)
  • April 2019 (254)
  • May 2019 (272)
  • June 2019 (252)
  • July 2019 (340)
  • August 2019 (226)
  • 2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (219)
  • March 2018 (278)
  • April 2018 (225)
  • May 2018 (238)
  • June 2018 (178)
  • July 2018 (257)
  • August 2018 (249)
  • September 2018 (256)
  • October 2018 (287)
  • November 2018 (284)
  • December 2018 (187)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (195)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (205)
  • July 2017 (190)
  • August 2017 (195)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (235)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (165)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (190)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (246)
  • June 2016 (183)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (249)
  • September 2016 (234)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (153)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (166)
  • April 2015 (109)
  • May 2015 (117)
  • June 2015 (121)
  • July 2015 (150)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (189)
  • October 2015 (170)
  • November 2015 (174)
  • December 2015 (208)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950