7 Reasons Why Kenya Kwanza Leaders Should Stop Lying To Kenyans

By Steve Biko Wafula / Published March 14, 2023 | 7:23 pm




KEY POINTS

Lying by elected leaders can have serious consequences for society, including social unrest, political polarization, and even violence. It can create a climate of fear, mistrust, and suspicion that is detrimental to the well-being of individuals and communities.


Kenya

KEY TAKEAWAYS


As a leader, one of the most important qualities to possess is integrity, which involves being honest and truthful with your followers. Lying to your followers can have disastrous consequences, both for the leader and the people they lead. 


Elected leaders have a responsibility to act in the best interests of the people they serve. Lying to their followers undermines that responsibility and erodes trust between leaders and their constituents.

When leaders lie, they may misrepresent the facts, hide information, or mislead their followers. This can result in uninformed decisions, misguided policies, and harm to individuals or communities. It can also lead to a breakdown in democratic processes and institutions, as people lose faith in their leaders and their ability to govern effectively.

Additionally, lying by elected leaders can have serious consequences for society, including social unrest, political polarization, and even violence. It can create a climate of fear, mistrust, and suspicion that is detrimental to the well-being of individuals and communities.

As a leader, one of the most important qualities to possess is integrity, which involves being honest and truthful with your followers. Lying to your followers can have disastrous consequences, both for the leader and the people they lead. In this article, we will examine why leaders should never lie to their followers, using examples of African presidents;

  1. Loss of Trust: When leaders lie to their followers, it erodes the trust that they have worked hard to build with them. Trust is the foundation of any relationship, and once it is lost, it is difficult to regain. An example of a leader who lost the trust of his followers due to lying is Robert Mugabe, former president of Zimbabwe. Mugabe promised to improve the economy of Zimbabwe but failed to deliver on his promises. His lies and broken promises eroded the trust that the people of Zimbabwe had in him.
  2. Credibility: Leaders who lie lose their credibility. Once a leader is caught in a lie, their credibility is compromised. People are less likely to believe them in the future. An example of a leader who lost his credibility due to lying is Yahya Jammeh, former president of The Gambia. Jammeh claimed to have a cure for AIDS, which he called “green tea.” This claim was not only false but also dangerous, as it encouraged people to stop taking antiretroviral drugs. His lies about the cure made people lose faith in him and his government.
  3. Damage to Reputation: Lying as a leader can damage your reputation. Once a leader is caught in a lie, it becomes part of their legacy. An example of a leader who damaged his reputation due to lying is Muammar Gaddafi, the former leader of Libya. Gaddafi claimed to be a man of the people, fighting for the rights of the oppressed. However, his lies and oppressive regime tarnished his reputation, and he became known as a dictator.
  4. Lack of Accountability: Lying as a leader can lead to a lack of accountability. When leaders lie, they are less likely to take responsibility for their actions. An example of a leader who lacked accountability due to lying is Jacob Zuma, former president of South Africa. Zuma lied about his involvement in corruption and was accused of using public funds to renovate his private home. Instead of taking responsibility for his actions, he blamed others for his problems.
  5. Loss of Legitimacy: Lying as a leader can lead to a loss of legitimacy. When leaders lie, they undermine the legitimacy of their position. An example of a leader who lost his legitimacy due to lying is Laurent Gbagbo, former president of Cote d’Ivoire. Gbagbo lost the presidential election but refused to step down, claiming that he had won. His lies about the election results led to violence and instability in the country, and he was eventually forced out of power.
  6. Ethical Considerations: Lying as a leader raises ethical considerations. Leaders have a responsibility to act in the best interests of their followers. Lying goes against this responsibility and can lead to harm. An example of a leader who acted unethically by lying is Omar al-Bashir, former president of Sudan. Al-Bashir lied about the genocide in Darfur and denied that it was happening. His lies allowed the genocide to continue unchecked.
  7. Lack of Transparency: Lying as a leader can lead to a lack of transparency. Leaders have a responsibility to be transparent about their actions and decisions. Lying undermines this responsibility and can lead to suspicion and distrust. An example of a leader who lacked transparency due to lying is Paul Biya, president of Cameroon. Biya has been accused of rigging elections and suppressing opposition, but he denies these accusations.

Overall, lying by elected leaders is not only wrong but also harmful to the democratic principles and values on which societies are built. It is crucial for leaders to be honest, transparent, and accountable to the people they serve to maintain trust and foster a healthy democracy.

Related Content: Rigathi Gachagua’s Remarks On State Jobs Contradicts Article 27: Here Are 10 Reasons Why The Man Is Wrong




About Steve Biko Wafula

Steve Biko is the CEO OF Soko Directory and the founder of Hidalgo Group of Companies. Steve is currently developing his career in law, finance, entrepreneurship and digital consultancy; and has been implementing consultancy assignments for client organizations comprising of trainings besides capacity building in entrepreneurial matters.He can be reached on: +254 20 510 1124 or Email: info@sokodirectory.com

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