More than 70% of Kenyans Use Counterfeit Goods – Smartphones Lead

By Korir Isaac / February 12, 2019




More than 70 percent of Kenyans use counterfeit goods, says a new study presented by Anti-Counterfeits Agency.

The report reveals that of the total number of those using these goods, 19 percent buy them knowingly, 49.6 percent purchased them for being cheap.

Another 17.3 percent who were looking for genuine products but couldn’t find them opted for the counterfeits whereas 18.3 percent bought the goods unknowingly.

Leading with the highest percentage of counterfeit goods are mobile phones with 51.8 percent. Alcohol comes in second with 30.8 percent, DVD players at 26.4 percent, and bottled water at 24 percent.

Lubricants, computer software, accessories, and toners are other goods highly counterfeited.

According to the ACA chair Flora Mutahi, counterfeiting has risen as a result of branding, trademark manipulation, mis-spelling of names and coloring.

“Whereas there is a market for cheap counterfeit goods, it is not easy for consumers to notice the majority of these goods. Again, most are not displayed in shops but stored at home or in washrooms becoming a challenge for the agency to counter it,” she said.

She noted the case of Pakistan rice packaged as Mwea rice, and pesticides as well as other chemicals sold without conclusive instructions for use as some of the things that are becoming a challenge in the industry.

Read: Agency urged to Toughen laws on counterfeit in the manufacturing industry

ACA claims that the easy entry of goods from outside Kenya and the East Africa integration move have rendered their efforts of fighting the vice almost fruitless. The agency says that the majority of traders are intercepting goods destined for Uganda and South Sudan.

Elema Halake, the ACA chief executive, however, noted that the fight against illicit trade at the airport, seaports, and the Inland Container Depot Nairobi (ICDC) extensions are bearing fruit.

The agency fights such cases together with the Kenya Bureau of Standards, the Office of the Attorney-General, Financial Reporting Centre, Kenya Revenue Authority, the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, the Immigration Department, Inspector-General of Police, and the Kenya Revenue Authority.

According to the research, due to the improved efforts in the fight against counterfeit goods by the multi-agency, there was a significant drop in counterfeit electronics in the industry to 66.61 percent in 2014 from 79.7 percent in 2010.

Among other goods that have experienced a drop in counterfeiting are pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, which declined by 9.63 percent from 64.1 percent.

Read More: Kenya Ranked Top in Counterfeit Pharmaceutical Drug Trafficking 

Alcohol, beverages, and cigarettes declined by 8.14 percent from 62.5 percent over the period under review.

The least counterfeited goods include stationery with 2.16 percent compared to 2.7 percent fake ones in the market as of 2014 and 2010 respectively.

“Kenya is indeed ahead of its counterparts in the fight against counterfeits but manned land borders open the country to illicit trade. We hope to strengthen collaboration with county governments to ensure border control,” Halake said.

ACA announced a pending anti-counterfeiting bill to the East Africa Legislative Authority to bar goods being imported back from the region.

The agency also hopes to introduce an anti-counterfeiting mark for locally manufactured goods that will allow recording of an Intellectual Property Right that can be scanned easily with devices like a mobile phone.

Also Read: 

Be Wary of Fake Stores When Shopping Online, CA Warn

Want to Avoid Fake Smartphones? Buy from Telkom Shops



About Korir Isaac

A creative, tenacious, and passionate journalist with impeccable ethics and a nose for anticipated and spontaneous news. He may not say it, but he sure can make one hell of a story.

View other posts by Korir Isaac


More Articles From This Author








Other Related Articles










SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE

ARCHIVES

2019
  • January 2019 (256)
  • February 2019 (216)
  • March 2019 (288)
  • April 2019 (167)
  • 2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (220)
  • March 2018 (279)
  • April 2018 (226)
  • May 2018 (240)
  • June 2018 (178)
  • July 2018 (257)
  • August 2018 (250)
  • September 2018 (256)
  • October 2018 (287)
  • November 2018 (286)
  • December 2018 (187)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (195)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (206)
  • July 2017 (190)
  • August 2017 (195)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (235)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (166)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (190)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (246)
  • June 2016 (183)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (249)
  • September 2016 (234)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (153)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (166)
  • April 2015 (109)
  • May 2015 (117)
  • June 2015 (121)
  • July 2015 (150)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (189)
  • October 2015 (170)
  • November 2015 (174)
  • December 2015 (208)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950