Roadside Declarations Will Hurt The Economy More Than Before

By Getrude Mathayo / Published November 1, 2022 | 2:58 pm




KEY POINTS

Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) is one of the systems that can be described as the engine of the economy. Without KRA, there would be no Kenya. It is like a river that feeds water into an ocean called Kenya.


Kenya

KEY TAKEAWAYS


When the new regime came into place, they started issuing directives that will do more harm to the economy than good.

For instance, the regime directed the reopening of some companies and factories that had been shut down by the Kenya Revenue Authority for either selling dangerous products or disregarding the law.


There is a reason why there are systems in place. A country is not defined by the strong men and women it has, but by the strong systems that have been put in place. Systems are the ones that create order and order breeds productivity.

The government of President William Ruto came to power with much pomp and color. People in the streets sang and danced to the famous Sarafina song Freedom Is Coming. After the government was sworn in, they said, Freedom Is Here.

Part of the freedom that Kenyans and institutions expected was independence, law and order, and a smooth flow of chain of communication by use of systems that have been put in place by the laws of Kenya.

Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) is one of the systems that can be described as the engine of the economy. Without KRA, there would be no Kenya. It is like a river that feeds water into an ocean called Kenya.

President William Ruto gave them a target of collecting 3 trillion shillings as revenue. It was a hard and tough target that the institution has taken up and is trying to collect those taxes across the country. But revenues and taxes can only be collected if the country has genuine and stable businesses that follow and abide by the law.

When the new regime came into place, they started issuing directives that will do more harm to the economy than good. For instance, the regime directed the reopening of some companies and factories that had been shut down by the Kenya Revenue Authority for either selling dangerous products or disregarding the law.

Some of them such as Africa Spirits Limited, Big Five Breweries Limited, Blix Inn Limited, Crystal World Agencies Limited, Biscept Limited, Crywan Enterprise Limited, Elle Kenya Limited, and Fai Amarillo Limited among others, have been reopened following the directive by the regime without following the due process that is laid down by the law.

The directive to reopen the factories disregards the fact that the factories had been closed because of a variety of issues ranging from criminal activities (like Africa Spirit’s counterfeiting stamps) to compliance with tax and standards. The directive negates the work KRA and other authorities have been doing over the past few years and will impact negatively on the morale of the officers and the revenue in general.

There are some disgruntled voices among KRA officials who are unhappy with the blatant disregard for the work they have done, the law, and the interference with their work. This, despite the fact that the government wants them to collect more taxes, will demotivate them.

The regime should know that allowing factories that had been shut down without regard for the law exposes Kenyans to potentially harmful products. Is this what the government wants?

Has the regime sat down and reviewed the danger it is exposing Kenyans and the country to? Do we want to make the country like a jungle where there are no rules and systems to follow?






More Articles From This Author








Trending Stories










Other Related Articles










SOKO DIRECTORY & FINANCIAL GUIDE



ARCHIVES

2022
  • January 2022 (293)
  • February 2022 (329)
  • March 2022 (360)
  • April 2022 (294)
  • May 2022 (271)
  • June 2022 (232)
  • July 2022 (278)
  • August 2022 (253)
  • September 2022 (246)
  • October 2022 (196)
  • November 2022 (230)
  • December 2022 (10)
  • 2021
  • January 2021 (182)
  • February 2021 (227)
  • March 2021 (325)
  • April 2021 (259)
  • May 2021 (285)
  • June 2021 (273)
  • July 2021 (277)
  • August 2021 (232)
  • September 2021 (271)
  • October 2021 (305)
  • November 2021 (364)
  • December 2021 (249)
  • 2020
  • January 2020 (272)
  • February 2020 (310)
  • March 2020 (390)
  • April 2020 (321)
  • May 2020 (335)
  • June 2020 (327)
  • July 2020 (333)
  • August 2020 (276)
  • September 2020 (214)
  • October 2020 (233)
  • November 2020 (242)
  • December 2020 (187)
  • 2019
  • January 2019 (251)
  • February 2019 (215)
  • March 2019 (283)
  • April 2019 (254)
  • May 2019 (269)
  • June 2019 (249)
  • July 2019 (335)
  • August 2019 (293)
  • September 2019 (306)
  • October 2019 (313)
  • November 2019 (362)
  • December 2019 (318)
  • 2018
  • January 2018 (291)
  • February 2018 (213)
  • March 2018 (275)
  • April 2018 (223)
  • May 2018 (235)
  • June 2018 (176)
  • July 2018 (256)
  • August 2018 (247)
  • September 2018 (255)
  • October 2018 (282)
  • November 2018 (282)
  • December 2018 (184)
  • 2017
  • January 2017 (183)
  • February 2017 (194)
  • March 2017 (207)
  • April 2017 (104)
  • May 2017 (169)
  • June 2017 (205)
  • July 2017 (189)
  • August 2017 (195)
  • September 2017 (186)
  • October 2017 (235)
  • November 2017 (253)
  • December 2017 (266)
  • 2016
  • January 2016 (164)
  • February 2016 (165)
  • March 2016 (189)
  • April 2016 (143)
  • May 2016 (245)
  • June 2016 (182)
  • July 2016 (271)
  • August 2016 (247)
  • September 2016 (233)
  • October 2016 (191)
  • November 2016 (243)
  • December 2016 (153)
  • 2015
  • January 2015 (1)
  • February 2015 (4)
  • March 2015 (164)
  • April 2015 (107)
  • May 2015 (116)
  • June 2015 (119)
  • July 2015 (145)
  • August 2015 (157)
  • September 2015 (186)
  • October 2015 (169)
  • November 2015 (173)
  • December 2015 (205)
  • 2014
  • March 2014 (2)
  • 2013
  • March 2013 (10)
  • June 2013 (1)
  • 2012
  • March 2012 (7)
  • April 2012 (15)
  • May 2012 (1)
  • July 2012 (1)
  • August 2012 (4)
  • October 2012 (2)
  • November 2012 (2)
  • December 2012 (1)
  • 2011
    2010
    2009
    2008
    2007
    2006
    2005
    2004
    2003
    2002
    2001
    2000
    1999
    1998
    1997
    1996
    1995
    1994
    1993
    1992
    1991
    1990
    1989
    1988
    1987
    1986
    1985
    1984
    1983
    1982
    1981
    1980
    1979
    1978
    1977
    1976
    1975
    1974
    1973
    1972
    1971
    1970
    1969
    1968
    1967
    1966
    1965
    1964
    1963
    1962
    1961
    1960
    1959
    1958
    1957
    1956
    1955
    1954
    1953
    1952
    1951
    1950